The beast is born

Ruth,
I believe the plan is to use off-the-shelf GM parts (clutch/pressure plate and starter). Not too expensive either. LS compatible components. No need for the KEP components.
Back to the clutch, etc. Here's preliminary info on the stock part numbers based on our perusing the GMPP online catalogue.

Standard Flywheel 153 tooth
P/N 12571611

LS3/LS7 Clutch disc and pressure plate
P/N 24248985

LS Series Starter
P/N 10465385

Does anyone know. . . can the bolts that hold on the as-shipped but non-usable stock flexplate be reused to attached the replacement flywheel, or are the bolts a onetime use item?
 

Ken Roberts

Supporter
The flywheel and flexplate use the same bolts and they are not torque to yield fasteners (one time use).

I would be worried if the flexplate bolts were torqued by someone with a cheap/inaccurate torque wrench but these bolts will have been torqued by GM assemblers using very high quality torque wrenches that are recalibrated regularly. Stretching the threads by over torquing is what you want to avoid.
 
Thats a great price for that engine, we have used a lot of the 376 packages and they make for a fun SL-C ...
Sometimes the idle quality is not as nice as I would like ...certainly not the same as the stock LS3 but for track use its got plenty of grunt and the idle can be rectified by a quick trip to the dyno for a tune up
Hey Fran;

Your response reminded me of an assumption I have regarding a street SLC build. I was planning on re-camming the motor to trade torque for HP. I assumed that would be an acceptable trade-off given the relative lightweight (2200lbs?) of an SLC versus the weight of the vehicles the LS+ series of motors are designed for.

BUT, realizing that is an assumption, I think it best to ask: Obviously this could be overdone, but re-camming to pick up 30hp shouldn't disrupt things too much, or is my thought process going down the wrong road?

thx.
 
Hey Fran;

Your response reminded me of an assumption I have regarding a street SLC build. I was planning on re-camming the motor to trade torque for HP. I assumed that would be an acceptable trade-off given the relative lightweight (2200lbs?) of an SLC versus the weight of the vehicles the LS+ series of motors are designed for.

BUT, realizing that is an assumption, I think it best to ask: Obviously this could be overdone, but re-camming to pick up 30hp shouldn't disrupt things too much, or is my thought process going down the wrong road?

thx.
IME, you are on the right path camming the ls3, but you won't give up any torque. You will only gain torque and HP. You *may* lose some tq at very low engine speeds depending on the actual specs and supporting setup (more than likely not unless you over cam it).

Even if the powerband is shifted up slightly, not only would you most likely not notice, it would most likely make the power a bit more usable. Win/win.
 
Just got done reading through the SL-C specific ISIS manual (Thanks Jay). Brilliant. Just brilliant. The amount of time this saves on a build will be HUGE.:2thumbsup:
 
Yes it will.....a very worthy addition to a worthy car...but I may be a little biased....
Told ya it was a great system 2yrs ago ;)

Just like I told ya there's a demand for a 917 chassis that will functionally accept a big block chevy ;)

*whistles innocently*
 

Fran Hall RCR

Moderator
GT40s Sponsor
whistles innocently my a*s....now take yourself outside and find a nice friendly moose to cuddle....

You like ISIS because you are colour blind...:shocked:

NO big block 917'S....EVER.......:evil:

Just like your invisible engine....whistles even more innocently....did you ever think I may know your engine builder and thats why you have not received it yet...or put that nasty Carb thingy into an SL-C yet....whistle.....whistle...
 
w
NO big block 917'S....EVER.......:evil:
!!!!..........!!!!!!!....!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :(

w
Just like your invisible engine....whistles even more innocently....did you ever think I may know your engine builder and thats why you have not received it yet...or put that nasty Carb thingy into an SL-C yet....whistle.....whistle...
You can only delay the inevitable of having carb'd SLCs for so long ya know :lipsrsealed:

Even if I fail Howard will succeed, hahaha :D
 
Two questions that I pondered today as I sat in line at the store.

1) Why do people screw the rear window down instead of using the window adhesive like on the front windshield

2) If Fran now leaves the fiberglass piece in place where the high-mounted mirrors will go in the future, and a person goes with the low mirrors, would you advise that they paint that piece the color of the body, or black, or remove the piece altogether thereby eliminating that option for the future.

These are the things that occupy the last little bits of my brains bandwidth. . . .
 
Two questions that I pondered today as I sat in line at the store.

1) Why do people screw the rear window down instead of using the window adhesive like on the front windshield

2) If Fran now leaves the fiberglass piece in place where the high-mounted mirrors will go in the future, and a person goes with the low mirrors, would you advise that they paint that piece the color of the body, or black, or remove the piece altogether thereby eliminating that option for the future.

These are the things that occupy the last little bits of my brains bandwidth. . . .
You could glue the rear window down but it's plastic so you'd need the right adhessive. 5 #6 screws is easier, especially when it comes time to remove it.
 
Ruth, it will be more secure with a few screws regardless. I'm deciding if I should
replace the back window with a molded-in fiberglass panel with vents, or to go ahead and use the back window as is. If I use the Lexan part, I'll use both urethane and screws (just because). But I'm a "belts and suspenders" guy.

Likely never to remove it anyway...
 
Looking through my old GTM notes over the weekend before they went into storage, some AC questions arose. The Vintage Air unit being used on the GTM when coupled with the LS plumbing caused problems. See the link below. Has this been resolved with Vintage Air implementation in the SL-C?

Aluminum Cooling Tube Orientation - Page 6 - FFCars.com : Factory Five Racing Discussion Forum
Same engine, same problems.

The first problem is that the LS engines want to see coolant flow through the heater ports, or overheating can occur when idling a cold engine. This is a problem specific to all LS engines with aftermarket AC. The factory evaporator actually circulates coolant through the heater core all the time on the Corvette (and most all other modern cars, actually). This permits the automatic climate control system to blend AC with heated air to get the exact temp commanded by the user. The Gen-IV units that VA sells do this, but they are way too big to fit in the SLC (I've tried, believe me!). Since the smaller evaps we use tend not to have the sophisticated blend door management to do this, this approach doesn't work for us. The solution to this is to use an electronic 4-port valve that allows the coolant to recirculate back to the engine when heat is not needed, and allows it to recirc through the heater coil when heat is needed. The valve is readily available at Chevs of the 40s: OAP50-1555 - HEATER CONTROL VALVE -ELECTRONIC and other places.

The second problem is how to manage the fans, since the ECM wants to control them, as does the trinary switch. A simple circuit solves the problem, or using ISIS makes it even simpler.

The final problem is that the compressor needs to be taken off line (i.e., the compressor clutch disengaged) when very high engine speeds are seen. One solution to this is to wire an RPM switch in series with the clutch so that it is disengaged at a specific RPM. MSD sells these and they are available from Jegs, Summit, etc. FFR blew up several compressors on their LS7-powered GTM until they figured this out. There may be a way to manage this inside the ECM by using HP Tuners, EFI Live, etc instead of the RPM switch- more experienced people would have to chine in here...

All up, no real problems that haven't already been solved.
 
Now THAT was a helpful post! :crown:
Thanks Will.
Will is wealth of information. He is the SLC wizard. Full of cool ideas, stories, and insights. I have his # on speed dial and programmed into my bluetooth. He is probably sick of me calling him to pick his brain by now.

The only bad part is that after speaking to Will my build timeline mysteriously gets longer. :stunned:
 
Top